Eitan Shiskoff

Executive Director
Tents of Mercy Network
 
 
 
 
 
 
"These towns are open to attack, yet they are fully functioning, content with their sensitive position. They know their importance and without pretense proclaim Israel's return to our ancient home. Is this not what I am called to do?"
 
 

Near summer's end, while vacationing at a northern kibbutz, I took my daughter to an early bus to get back to her IDF base. A sudden inspiration carried me through Kiryat Shmona, climbing toward the higher elevation of Metulah, another 6 kilometers (almost 4 miles) up the road. Metulah is the northernmost town in Israel. It sits on a high ridge overlooking Lebanon.

On the way I found myself interceding for these Israeli "outposts." They're not really outposts, but I thought about how vulnerable these towns are. They are RIGHT on the border and have already been fired on many, many times. From the mid 1970s until 2000, when Israel withdrew from Southern Lebanon, rocket attacks were an almost daily affair. In the 34 days of the 2006 Second Lebanon War, 1012 rockets hit Kiryat Shmona. Half of the town evacuated and the other half endured the barrages in bomb shelters.

As I continued driving I began calling on the God of Israel, declaring His protection over the area and reminding Him of His protective attributes, oft-cited in Scripture: High Tower, The Rock of our Salvation, Our Defense, Our Savior, Our Shield, He who surrounds us with songs of deliverance. These prayers became more than a remote request for blessing. The tangible, ongoing need of my northern countrymen infused me with fresh, passionate faith in identification with their vulnerability.

Arriving at a stunning outlook point called Dado Lookout I was greeted by a pre-sunrise view of the upper Hula Valley. Orchards and fertile fields emerged into view as the sun slowly broke through low morning clouds. I felt more alive than usual, as if God was pulling me close and opening a curtain on just one small portion of His grandeur. At the same time I began reflecting on our people, Israel. A longing welled up in me, a longing for my people to know our true Defender/Redeemer, Messiah Yeshua. My intercession became a cry for the revelation of His atoning mercy here, in Eretz Yisrael, where He was born, lived, manifested the Glory, was executed and conquered death. Then it hit me, in a simple parallel with the security needs of Metula and Kiryat Shmona.

In order to convey the reality of Yeshua as Israel's Messiah to Israel, we must be secure. There is a level of unashamed, restful confidence that comes from Him, that is the foundation for reaching out in love. These towns are open to attack, yet they are fully functioning, content with their sensitive position. They know their importance and without pretense proclaim Israel's return to our ancient home. Is this not what I am called to do? He is my Shepherd and Commander, my Healer and my Comforter. If God is for me, who can be against me (Romans 8:31)? That being the case, interacting with my fellow Israelis, or anybody else, becomes an opportunity - an opening for Him to touch another through me.

May these northern towns dwell securely, and may we enter a new level of inner security, to make Messiah known.

By Eitan Shishkoff
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Also in this issue of the newsletter:
Daniel Juster: The Great Housing Protests
Marty Shoub: Yes & Amen
Eitan Shishkoff: The Pleasure of Doing Good
Asher Intrater: Feast of Tabernacles and the Millennial Kingdom
Betty Intrater: Visit to Auschwitz